Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Monday, July 16th, 2018

Peace Talks with Taliban Faster Than Ever, Claims Mujahid

Peace Talks with Taliban Faster  Than Ever, Claims Mujahid

GARDEZ - High Peace Council (HPC) officials say contacts with the Taliban are more frequent than ever and negotiations with the insurgent group are ongoing.
HPC officials made the remarks at a meeting here with religious scholars, tribal elders and youth. Creation of a coherent mechanism for the peace process came up for discussion.
Abdul Hakim Mujahid, a member of the Executive Council of HPC, said peace talks with the Taliban militants were proceeding faster than ever before. The parleys would yield a positive outcome, he hoped.
He said that contacts between the Taliban and the government had increased and both sides had held direct talks several times.
Mujahid called lack of trust was the only challenge. Pointing to recent meetings in Qatar and Oman, he said such sessions were helpful in creating an environment of confidence.
“Talks are going well. A meeting will be also held in the United Arab Emirates in the near future. All sides have sincerity of intent for understand that war is not a solution.
“People are tired of war. Creating a mechanism acceptable to all warring sides and regional countries is a fundamental point,” he remarked.
Maulvi Khaliqdad Haqqani, HPC head for Paktia province, also claimed enhanced willingness for peace on both sides. However, he stressed security for those joining the peace process and trust between the two parties.
"War is not the solution, both sides are in contact. Distrust exists, but such meetings can help identify problems. The important thing is that everyone should feel safe,” he said.
But tribal elders accused foreigners of interfering in the peace process and creating problems. They called for independence of the government and the Taliban. Both sides should try to put an end to the conflict, he believed.
Haji Hazrat, a tribal elder, said he knew many militants who did not want to fight any longer, but lack of security and confidence kept them at war.
“Foreigners don’t want peace in our country. Some of them interfere in government affairs. If there is a real international desire for peace, then interference should end.
“Leaders should be allowed to take decisions independently. If this happens, you will see major changes and peace in near future,” he concluded. (Pajhwok)