Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Monday, January 22nd, 2018

The Most Dangerous Place for Women to Live in

For women, life can't change until they haven't the same rights as men in making decisions at family to national level. Such a condition will never triumph in Afghanistan, unless democracy is strong and law and justice govern it.

Afghanistan, a country where the lowest level of security prevails, is the top producer of opium, falls in the list of most corrupt states and has recently been ranked the most dangerous country for women.Afghanistan has been voted the most dangerous country for women in a poll of experts by the Thomson Reuters Foundation.AntonellaNotari, head of Women Change Makers, a group that supports women social entrepreneurs globally, said a combination of on-going conflict, NATO airstrikes and cultural practices made Afghanistan a "very dangerous place" for women to live in. Afghanistan is followed by Congo, Pakistan and India at 2nd, 3rd and 4th positions respectively.

The ranking comes at times when 14th June was marked the mother day in Afghanistan. Several workshops, seminars and other gatherings were held in different provinces and capital of Afghanistan. Although such programs are deemed important to draw attention of government and public towards the problems of mother in particular and women in general, experts maintain such gatherings are no cure for the massive sufferings of Afghan women. Our country's poor rating in security, opium, corruption, poverty, women and children rights and so many others is doing much to defame our national image at world level.

Afghanistan has man-dominated society. Men have the upper hand and almost decide all the affairs of life. During Taliban, women's education was completely banned and even they were not allowed to come out of their houses without male accompanying them.
Since 2001, many things have changed for women. Today millions of girls go to schools and women participation in many fields including politics, media and business has increased, albeit this participation has faced grave hurdles and many women have lost their lives because of having roles in such areas. For a big portion of women population,life hasn't changed and still Taliban-like rules apply to them. For women life can't change until they do not have the same rights as men in making decisions atfamily to national levels. Such a condition will never triumph in Afghanistan, unless democracy is strong and law and justice govern it.