Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

Need Not Bolster Business Activities in Afghanistan

The environment for business activities in Afghanistan after the Taliban were expelled in 2001 is not that feasible as it should have been - with insecurity remaining the biggest hurdle. According to Afghanistan Investment Support Agency AISA, doing business in Afghanistan can be very rewarding. Even smaller investments may generate high profits in a short period of time. And yet, at least for the time being Afghanistan remains a challenging environment even to the most experienced professionals.

Currently there is no significant foreign investment in Afghanistan that could have immediate impacts on its economic well-being. This has caused high rates of unemployment in the country - around 50 per cent in Kabul and above that in the rest of the provinces. Although some external firms have invested in different sectors and are doing well, there is demand for more.

The reasons for inadequate external and internal investment are widely believed to be the long-term insecurity here. Both the national and international forces are putting tireless efforts to curb the regimes that are trying to increase instability in Afghanistan. But more than nine years efforts have borne no sweet fruit and Afghanistan is still a burden on the shoulders of international community. We cannot hope for swift economical prosperity if the situation consistently remains so.

One prominent factor supporting the economy of Afghanistan is conceived to be the injection of international funds in Afghanistan. The international aids have helped government enhance its functions across Afghanistan. However at the same time Afghanistan has been ranked second in corruption after Somalia - this is highly hampering our economy to grow.

Little employment opportunities have led Afghanistan to move to neighboring and foreign countries. Majority of the Afghan population live below the poverty line. Their lives are subjected to numerous economical hurdles that do not permit them to pay attention elsewhere except earning livelihood.

Here the necessity for immediate measures from the government side is felt. But instability in the Afghan politics hardly let the leaders ponder about effective economic boosters. In order to achieve economic independence, the Afghan government and its international partners need to make Afghanistan a feasible and attractive place for foreign and domestic investors.

Peace in Afghanistan will make it a real land of opportunities. There is need to lay down a strong economical foundation in a secure environment and this will bring gradual economic betterment in the lives of masses.

For instance the province of Bamyan is an attracting site for tourism. Investment in such business can generate notable revenues to the government and the investing firm and will improve the living conditions of residents of the province. But the government is not doing enough and consequently it has to remain dependent on foreign aids for long terms.