Editor in Chief: Moh. Reza Huwaida Sunday, September 23rd, 2018

Begging, Now a Culture

Walk anywhere in any major cities and districts of Afghanistan, you will find every fourth or fifth person begging. In the capital of AfWalk anywhere in any major cities and districts of Afghanistan, you
will find every fourth or fifth person begging. In the capital of Afghanistan where more than five million people currently live, the problem is manifold. In other words, begging has turned into a part of Afghan culture and the trend is transferred from one generation to another. Of course, all beggars beg because they form the poorest section of society.

Not many people in Afghanistan are rich. According to United Nations figures, in Afghanistan 36 percent of people live below the line of poverty while a big portion of the remaining people is slightly above this line. Poverty is the real cause for the people to beg and the number of such people is uncontrollably increasing.

One of the main purpose of the billions of international aids received in the last decade has been bolstering the economy of Afghanistan. Even during the recent global financial crisis, our economy grew. There is no doubt that economy has undergone positive changes. But these changes have occurred at higher levels mostly and the economic problems of common men have further deteriorated. This is signaled by the growing number of beggars in the country whose life seems not to have bettered due the huge amounts of funds poured in Afghanistan.

Begging is not allowed in Islam and one has to kill his self respect before going out for begging. Despite that, Afghans are compelled to get involved in this undesirable activity. The three decades of war has left many people disabled, orphan or widow. Lack of attention of government and other concerned organizations has added fuel to the long suffering of Afghanistan and this is quite clearly exhibited by widely scattered network of beggars in the country.

The government has failed to tackle the swiftly growingnumber of beggars, although this trend has negative impacts on the general image of Afghanistan. The government should target the root cause of this issue by creating more job opportunities, discouraging the profession of begging and helping the beggars establish small businesses of their own.

ghanistan where more than five million people currently live, the problem is manifold. In other words, begging has turned into a part of Afghan culture and the trend is transferred from one generation to another. Of course, all beggars beg because they form the poorest section of society. Not many people in Afghanistan are rich. According to United Nations figures, in Afghanistan 36 percent of people live below the line of poverty while a big portion of the remaining people is slightly above this line. Poverty is the real cause for the people to beg and the number of such people is uncontrollably increasing. One of the main purpose of the billions of international aids received in the last decade has been bolstering the economy of Afghanistan. Even during the recent global financial crisis, our economy grew.

There is no doubt that economy has undergone positive changes. But these changes have occurred at higher levels mostly and the economic problems of common men have further deteriorated. This is signaled by the growing number of beggars in the country whose life seems not to have bettered due the huge amounts of funds poured in Afghanistan. Begging is not allowed in Islam and one has to kill his self respect before going out for begging. Despite that, Afghans are compelled to get involved in this undesirable activity.

The three decades of war has left many people disabled, orphan or widow. Lack of attention of government and other concerned organizations has added fuel to the long suffering of Afghanistan and this is quite clearly exhibited by widely scattered network of beggars in the country. The government has failed to tackle the swiftly growingnumber of beggars, although this trend has negative impacts on the general image of Afghanistan. The government should target the root cause of this issue by creating more job opportunities, discouraging the profession of begging and helping the beggars establish small businesses of their own.